Skip to content
Events
Students showcasing research posters at the 2015 GCEP Symposium

ERE PhD Defense: Chris Zahasky — "Advancing utilization of positron emission tomography for quantifying fluid transport and CO2 trapping in geologic porous media"

June 14, 2018 -
9:00am to 10:00am
Green Earth Sciences Building, Room 365
Event Sponsor: 
Energy Resources Engineering
Contact Email: 
jpcastro@stanford.edu

PhD Defense:Chris Zahasky, Dept of Energy Resources Engineering

Refreshments starting from 8:45 am

"Advancing utilization of positron emission tomography for quantifying fluid transport and CO2 trapping in geologic porous media"

The reactions occurring during in-situ combustion are conventionally modelled using Arrhenius rate equations deduced from experimental data. There is no standard workflow for determining these reactions and they tend to be non-unique and highly parametric. This work provides a consistent and expedient way for testing the suitability and candidacy of an oil sample. We introduce a tabulation method that directly uses the experimental data to calculate the reaction rates. The reaction rates are stored as a function of temperature and how far along the reaction has progressed. Our proposed method is applicable to kinetic cell and combustion tube experiments. The sensitivity of the method to data density and time-stepping interval is also investigated.Accurate observations and descriptions of the role of heterogeneity on water and CO2 transport and immobilization in porous and fractured geologic media are important for understanding and modeling multiphase conditions present in geologic carbon storage reservoirs. Micro- positron emission tomography (micro-PET), in combination with other imaging methods such as X-ray computed tomography, is utilized to experimentally characterize a number of challenging fluid transport problems in geologic porous media. Experimental methods are developed to acquire high resolution micro-PET images that are utilized to identify fluid flow pathways and fractures in vesicular basalt cores, and quantify imbibition, advection, and diffusion of solute in heterogeneous sandstone cores.

More Information

Contact Phone: 
650-725.9835