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Energy@Stanford & SLAC 2021 Speakers

Inês Azevedo

Associate Professor, Energy Resources Engineering School of Earth and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment Stanford University

Dr. Azevedo’s research interests lie at the intersection of environmental, technical, and economic issues, such as how to address the challenge of climate change and to move towards a more sustainable energy system. She tackles complex problems in which traditional engineering plays an important role but cannot provide a complete answer. In particular, she has been looking at how energy systems are likely to be shaped in the future, which requires comprehensive knowledge not only of the technologies that can address future energy needs but also of the decision-making process followed by different agents in the economy. Dr. Azevedo has also been working on assessing how specific policies will shape future energy systems, especially in a carbon-constrained world.
 

Zhenan Bao

K. K. Lee Professor, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Chemistry

Zhenan Bao joined Stanford University in 2004. She is currently a K.K. Lee Professor in Chemical Engineering, and with courtesy appointments in Chemistry and Material Science and Engineering. She is the Department Chair of Chemical Engineering from 2018. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Inventors. She founded the Stanford Wearable Electronics Initiative (eWEAR) and is the current faculty director. She is also an affiliated faculty member of Precourt Institute, Woods Institute, ChEM-H and Bio-X. Professor Bao received her Ph.D. degree in Chemistry from The University of Chicago in 1995 and joined the Materials Research Department of Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies. She became a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff in 2001. Professor Bao currently has more than 600 refereed publications and more than 100 US patents. She served as a member of Executive Board of Directors for the Materials Research Society and Executive Committee Member for the Polymer Materials Science and Engineering division of the American Chemical Society. She was an Associate Editor for the Royal Society of Chemistry journal Chemical Science, Polymer Reviews and Synthetic Metals. She serves on the international advisory board for Advanced Materials, Advanced Energy Materials, ACS Nano, Accounts of Chemical Reviews, Advanced Functional Materials, Chemistry of Materials, Chemical Communications, Journal of American Chemical Society, Nature Asian Materials, Materials Horizon and Materials Today. She is one of the Founders and currently sits on the Board of Directors of C3 Nano Co. and PyrAmes, both are silicon valley venture funded companies. She is Fellow of AAAS, ACS, MRS, SPIE, ACS POLY and ACS PMSE. She was a recipient of the MRS Mid-Career Award in 2021, ACS Central Science Disruptor and Innovator Prize in 2020, ACS Gibbs Medal in 2020, the Wilhelm Exner Medal from the Austrian Federal Minister of Science in 2018, the L'Oreal UNESCO Women in Science Award North America Laureate in 2017. She was awarded the ACS Applied Polymer Science Award in 2017, ACS Creative Polymer Chemistry Award in 2013 ACS Cope Scholar Award in 2011, and was selected by Phoenix TV, China as 2010 Most influential Chinese in the World-Science and Technology Category. She is a recipient of the Royal Society of Chemistry Beilby Medal and Prize in 2009, IUPAC Creativity in Applied Polymer Science Prize in 2008, American Chemical Society Team Innovation Award 2001, R&D 100 Award, and R&D Magazine Editors Choice Best of the Best new technology for 2001. She has been selected in 2002 by the American Chemical Society Women Chemists Committee as one of the twelve Outstanding Young Woman Scientist who is expected to make a substantial impact in chemistry during this century. She is also selected by MIT Technology Review magazine in 2003 as one of the top 100 young innovators for this century. She has been selected as one of the recipients of Stanford Terman Fellow and has been appointed as the Robert Noyce Faculty Scholar, Finmeccanica Faculty Scholar and David Filo and Jerry Yang Faculty Scholar.

Brian Bartholomeusz

Executive Director of Innovation Transfer, TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy, TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy Operations

Brian has held senior technology management positions in startups and established companies. He has focused on business and technology strategy, and managed the development and commercialization of new products for renewable energy and consumer electronics. He facilitated successful cross-border joint ventures, technology partnerships, and collaborative technology and product development programs. Brian has co-founded three startups and participated in a successful initial public stock offering. He has written more than 25 peer-reviewed publications, submitted fourteen granted and pending patents, and spoken at industry events.

Sally Benson

Precourt Family Professor, Professor of Energy Resources Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and at the Woods Institute for the Environment

Sally M. Benson, who joined Stanford University in 2007, is the Precourt Family Professor in the Department of Energy Resources Engineering in the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences; she studies technologies and pathways to reducing greenhouse gas emissions including geologic storage of CO2 in deep underground formations and energy systems analysis for a low-carbon future. She is the Co-Director of the Stanford Center for Carbon Storage and the Stanford Carbon Removal Initiative. She served at the Director and Co-Director of the Precourt Institute for Energy from 2013 to 2020. She also served as the Director of the Global Climate and Energy Project from 2009 to 2019.

Prior to joining Stanford, Benson was Division Director for Earth Sciences, Associate Laboratory Director for Energy Sciences and Deputy Director at LBNL.

Professor Benson currently serves on the Board of Directors for Climate Central and from 2008 to 2020 on the Board of Directors of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Currently she also serves on the Advisory Boards for Breakthrough Energy Ventures, Argonne National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Princeton’s Carbon Mitigation Initiative, Princeton’s Adlinger Center, Japan’s Initiative for the Cool Earth Forum, Climate Vault, and the Lahore University of Management Science in Pakistan. Over the past several years she participated in a number of National Academy of Sciences, Secretary of Energy, and National Petroleum Council research needs assessments related to carbon management. She also is on the Editorial Board for Energy and Environmental Sciences.

Naomi Boness

Managing Director, Natural Gas Initiative, Department of Energy Resources Engineering - Energy Resources Engineering

Bruce Cain

Charles Louis Ducommun Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

Bruce E. Cain is a Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and Director of the Bill Lane Center for the American West. He received a BA from Bowdoin College (1970), a B Phil. from Oxford University (1972) as a Rhodes Scholar, and a Ph D from Harvard University (1976). He taught at Caltech (1976-89) and UC Berkeley (1989-2012) before coming to Stanford. Professor Cain was Director of the Institute of Governmental Studies at UC Berkeley from 1990-2007 and Executive Director of the UC Washington Center from 2005-2012. He was elected the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2000 and has won awards for his research (Richard F. Fenno Prize, 1988), teaching (Caltech 1988 and UC Berkeley 2003) and public service (Zale Award for Outstanding Achievement in Policy Research and Public Service, 2000). His areas of expertise include political regulation, applied democratic theory, representation and state politics. Some of Professor Cain’s most recent publications include “Malleable Constitutions: Reflections on State Constitutional Design,” coauthored with Roger Noll in University of Texas Law Review, volume 2, 2009; “More or Less: Searching for Regulatory Balance,” in Race, Reform and the Political Process, edited by Heather Gerken, Guy Charles and Michael Kang, CUP, 2011; “Redistricting Commissions: A Better Political Buffer?” in The Yale Law Journal, volume 121, 2012; and Democracy More or Less (CUP, 2015). He is currently working on problems of environmental governance.

Janet Chikofsky

Climate & Energy Program Coordinator, Climate Interactive

Janet Chikofsky is a Program Coordinator at Climate Interactive, where she provides research, analysis, and support for leaders using Climate Interactive’s climate and energy tools.


Janet earned her bachelor’s degree in Human Biology from Stanford University, where she concentrated in Environmental Health. Before joining Climate Interactive, she worked with Duke Medicine Global, a consulting team at Duke University providing global health education and policy analysis for international organizations. Janet has also worked for Heifer International, planning and facilitating experiential education programs addressing global poverty and environmental problems. Janet lives in North Carolina with her husband and enjoys backpacking in any mountain range she can find.

Srabanti Chowdhury

Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering , Senior Fellow, Precourt Institute for Energy

Srabanti Chowdhury is an associate professor in Electrical Engineering and a senior fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy, at Stanford University.

Her group works on wide bandgap materials and devices that drive a wide range of applications from 5G-and-beyond to future micro-grids; all for compact architecture and energy efficiency!

For her work in Gallium Nitride devices she has received several awards such as the DARPA-young faculty award, NSF CAREER and AFOSR Young investigator award, Sloan research Fellow in Physics, and young scientist award by the international symposium of compound semiconductors.

Her work has produced over 90 journal papers, and 120 conferences presentations, 6 book chapters and 26 issued patents.

She enjoys painting, and particularly drawn to adding the small details and subtleties!

William Chueh

Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

The availability of low-cost but intermittent renewable electricity (e.g., derived from solar and wind) underscores the grand challenge to store and dispatch energy so that it is available when and where it is needed. Redox-active materials promise the efficient transformation between electrical, chemical, and thermal energy, and are at the heart of carbon-neutral energy cycles. Understanding design rules that govern materials chemistry and architecture holds the key towards rationally optimizing technologies such as batteries, fuel cells, electrolyzers, and novel thermodynamic cycles. Electrochemical and chemical reactions involved in these technologies span diverse length and time scales, ranging from Ångströms to meters and from picoseconds to years. As such, establishing a unified, predictive framework has been a major challenge. The central question unifying our research is: “can we understand and engineer redox reactions at the levels of electrons, ions, molecules, particles and devices using a bottom-up approach?” Our approach integrates novel synthesis, fabrication, characterization, modeling and analytics to understand molecular pathways and interfacial structure, and to bridge fundamentals to energy storage and conversion technologies by establishing new design rules.

Daniel Norbert Congreve

Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering

Dan Congreve received his B.S. and M.S. from Iowa State in 2011, working with Vik Dalal studying defect densities of nano-crystalline and amorphous silicon. He received his PhD from MIT in 2015, studying under Marc Baldo. His thesis work focused on photonic energy conversion using singlet fission and triplet fusion as a downconverting and upconverting process, respectively. He joined the Rowland Institute at Harvard University in August 2016 as a Rowland Fellow. He started as an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford in Fall 2020. His current research interests include engineering nanoscale materials and using them to solve challenging problems.

Yi Cui

Director, Precourt Institute for Energy, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemistry

Cui studies fundamentals and applications of nanomaterials and develops tools for their understanding. Research Interests: nanotechnology, batteries, electrocatalysis, wearables, 2D materials, environmental technology (water, air, soil), cryogenic electron microscopy.

Stephen Eglash

Research Technical Manager of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Steve is Director of the Applied Energy Division at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The Applied Energy Division conducts research on the electric grid, batteries, photovoltaics, and advanced manufacturing. The Applied Energy Division is part of the Energy Sciences Directorate, which conducts research in chemistry, materials, computer science, and applied energy. SLAC is operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. Previously, Steve developed and managed research programs at Stanford University in artificial intelligence, computer science, energy, and sustainability. Steve helped to create new programs at Stanford such as the Institute for Human-Centered AI, SAIL-Toyota Center for AI Research, Stanford Data Science Initiative, Bay Area PV Consortium, and Energy and Environment Affiliates Program. Prior to joining Stanford, Steve was president and CEO of solar energy company Cyrium Technologies, consultant for the National Renewable Energy Lab and US Department of Energy, venture capitalist at Worldview Technology Partners, vice president at SDL (JDSU), and member of the technical staff at MIT Lincoln Laboratory. Steve received a PhD and MS from Stanford and BS from UC Berkeley, all in electrical engineering. Steve is a Fellow of the SPIE, a former Board member of the MRS, and a former utilities commissioner for the City of Palo Alto.

Chris Field

Melvin and Joan Lane Professor of Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies, Director, Woods Institute for the Environment, Professor of Earth System Science, of Biology and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

Chris Field is the Perry L. McCarty Director of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment and the Melvin and Joan Lane Professor for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies at Stanford University.

Prior to his 2016 appointment at the Stanford Woods Institute, Field was a staff member at the Carnegie Institution for Science (1984-2002) and founding director of the Carnegie’s Department of Global Ecology (2002-2016).

Field's research focuses on climate change, especially solutions that improve lives now, decrease the amount of future warming, and support vibrant economies. Recent projects emphasize decreasing risks from coastal flooding and wildfires. He has been deeply involved with national and international-efforts to advance understanding of global ecology and climate change. Field was co-chair of Working Group II of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (2008-2015), where he led the effort on “Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation” (2012), and “Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability(2014). His widely cited work has earned many recognitions, including election to the US National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Max Planck Research Award, and the Roger Revelle Medal. Field is a member of the Board of Directors of World Wildlife Fund (US) and the Board of Trustees of the California Academy of Sciences. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Geophysical Union, and the Ecological Society of America.

He holds a bachelor’s degree in biology from Harvard College and a Ph.D. in biology from Stanford.

Diana Gragg

Managing Director, Precourt Institute for Energy

Diana Gragg is the Managing Director of the Explore Energy program at the Precourt Institute for Energy.  Explore Energy is a student-engagement program that helps students navigate the variety of energy opportunities, courses, majors, internships/fellowships, and job opportunities related to energy across all of Stanford's seven schools.  Explore Energy also offers energy-related programs and courses for students, including Energy@Stanford&SLAC, Shultz Energy Fellowships, Summer Undergraduate Program on Energy Research (SUPER), and Energy Seminar.

Diana is also a Core Lecturer in the Civil & Environmental Engineering Department at Stanford University. She teaches a CEE/EarthSys course called Understanding Energy in the fall and spring and a related CEE course called Understanding Energy: Essentials during the summer as part of Summer Session. She delivers the course along with Jane Woodward and Kirsten Stasio.

Diana has a B.S. from the University of California, Berkeley in Chemical Engineering (2000), and M.S. and PhD degrees in the Atmosphere/Energy program in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford (2012). Her dissertation focused on atmospheric gas-phase and aqueous-phase chemistry and investigated the impact of ethanol (E85) use on urban air pollution. She was a Schneider Fellow at the Natural Resources Defense Council in Washington, D.C. working on transportation advocacy in the summer of 2005.

She worked for the Dow Chemical Company as a production engineer at a chlorine facility and as a project lead on energy efficiency projects from 2000 to 2004, and as a post-doctoral scholar investigating different areas of sustainable transportation at the Precourt Energy Efficiency Center at Stanford from 2012 to 2015. She grew up in Houston, Texas. She is an environmentalist and animal lover who enjoys hiking, running, skiing, playing water polo, hanging out with friends and family, connecting with students, and anything that involves spending time with her four kids, her husband Mike, and her dog Gus.

Stephan Graham

Chester Naramore Dean of the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences, Welton Joseph and Maud L¿Anphere Crook Professor of Applied Earth Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Geophysics and of Energy Resources Engineering

Holmes Hummel, PhD

Adjunct Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Thomas Jaramillo

Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering, of Photon Science and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

Recent years have seen unprecedented motivation for the emergence of new energy technologies. Global dependence on fossil fuels, however, will persist until alternate technologies can compete economically. We must develop means to produce energy (or energy carriers) from renewable sources and then convert them to work as efficiently and cleanly as possible. Catalysis is energy conversion, and the Jaramillo laboratory focuses on fundamental catalytic processes occurring on solid-state surfaces in both the production and consumption of energy. Chemical-to-electrical and electrical-to-chemical energy conversion are at the core of the research. Nanoparticles, metals, alloys, sulfides, nitrides, carbides, phosphides, oxides, and biomimetic organo-metallic complexes comprise the toolkit of materials that can help change the energy landscape. Tailoring catalyst surfaces to fit the chemistry is our primary challenge.

Drew Jones

Co-Director, Climate Interactive

Andrew Jones is Co-Founder and Co-Director of Climate Interactive and a Research Affiliate at MIT Sloan. An expert on international climate and energy issues, he is a system dynamics modeler, keynote speaker, and designer of simulation-based learning environments.

Trained in environmental engineering and system dynamics modeling through a B.A. at Dartmouth College and a M.S. in Technology and Policy at MIT, he worked in the 1990s at Rocky Mountain Institute and in the 2000s with Dana Meadows at Sustainability Institute. He teaches system dynamics at MIT Sloan and the Kenan-Flagler Business School at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
He and his team at Climate Interactive and MIT Sloan developed C-ROADS and En-ROADS, two user-friendly climate simulations in use by analysts around the world. His interviews have appeared in multiple media, including the New York Times, U.S. News, and NPR’s Morning Edition.
Jones has written two op-eds in the Sunday New York Times — one on building grounded hope and another in the form of an interactive simulation.
He co-accepted the “ASysT Prize” for “a significant accomplishment achieved through the application of systems thinking to a problem of U.S. national significance,” the System Dynamics Society’s award for the best real-world application of modeling, and Dartmouth College’s Ray W. Smith award for the most significant contribution to the status of the College.
Climate Interactive was named the Top US Energy and Environment Think Tank by Prospect Magazine.
He lives with his family in the mountains of Asheville, North Carolina.

Chi-Chang Kao

Director of SLAC, Professor of Photon Science and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

SLAC Director Chi-Chang Kao, a noted X-ray scientist, came to SLAC in 2010 to serve as associate laboratory director for the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. He became SLAC’s fifth director in November 2012.

Previously, Kao served for five years as chairperson of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. He undertook major upgrades to the light source's scientific programs and experimental facilities while developing potential science programs for NSLS-II, one of the newest and most advanced synchrotron facilities in the world. His research focuses on X-ray physics, superconductivity, magnetic materials and the properties of materials under high pressure.

Kao earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering in 1980 from National Taiwan University and a doctorate in chemical engineering from Cornell University in 1988. He joined Brookhaven shortly afterward, working his way from NSLS postdoctoral research assistant to chair. Kao also served as an adjunct professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Stony Brook University.

He was elected a fellow of the American Physical Society in 2006 and was named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2010 for his many contributions to resonant elastic and inelastic X-ray scattering techniques and their application to materials physics, as well as for his leadership at the NSLS.

Anthony Kinslow II

Lecturer, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Founder and CEO, Gemini Energy Solutions

Anthony, the Founder and CEO of Gemini Energy Solutions, is an expert in energy efficiency analytics and building science and a research-oriented practitioner who utilizes best practices from around the world to develop innovative solutions for his clients. His company's focus is reflective of Anthony's mission in life — making a meaningful impact on mitigating global warming. In Gemini, Anthony has created a vehicle to engage, educate, and energize underrepresented minority communities and the underserved small commercial building market in energy efficiency. Under Anthony’s leadership, Gemini is implementing strategies for overcoming cultural and socio-economic barriers that prevent the vast majority of Americans from being aware or engaged in energy efficiency. Operating nationwide, the company also partners with municipalities — such as San Francisco International Airport and Memphis, TN — to support their efforts to meet their climate change goals and increase economic resiliency through energy efficiency.

Liang Min

Managing Director for the Bits and Watts Initiative, Precourt Institute for Energy

Dr. Liang Min is the Managing Director of the Bits & Watts Initiative at Stanford University. Bits & Watts is a Stanford initiative bringing together multi-disciplinary research teams to enable digital transformation for the 21st century electric grid. Prior to joining Stanford, Liang has worked at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory since 2011, as the founding group leader of the energy delivery group and associate program leader for the national lab’s cyber & infrastructure resilience program. He was the Research Director for Livermore’s CES-21 Electric Operations program and had previously worked at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) as a senior project manager. Liang earned his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Texas A&M University in 2007. He holds two U.S. patents in voltage stability assessment.

Joel Moxley

Affiliate, Department of Energy Resources Engineering - Energy Resources Engineering

Joel Moxley is a Precourt Energy Scholar and Adjunct Professor at Stanford University. He currently teaches Stanford Climate Ventures (Energy 203). Joel received his B.S.E in chemical engineering from Princeton University, and his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Massachusetts Institute for Technology. He is a partner at Echelon Capital and a member of the investment team of Breakthrough Energy Ventures.

Simona Onori

Assistant Professor of Energy Resources Engineering and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

Simona Onori received her Laurea Degree, summa cum laude, (Electrical and Computer Engineering) in 2003, her M.S. (Electrical Engineering) in 2004, her Ph.D. (Control Engineering) in 2007, from University of Rome ‘Tor Vergata’, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, USA, and University of Rome ‘Tor Vergata’, respectively.
She is an Assistant Professor at Stanford University in Energy Resources Engineering, and Director of the Stanford Energy Control Lab since 2017. Previously, she was an Assistant Professor at Clemson University-International Center for Automotive Research (CU-ICAR) from 2013 to 2017 where she also held a courtesy appointment in Electrical Engineering. In 2007 she help a control research position at Thales-Alenia Space, in Rome, Italy where she worked on developing control algorithms for satellite control attitude stability. She was a Research Scientist with the Center for Automotive Research and lecturer in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The Ohio State from 2007 until 2013.
She held visiting professor positions at the University of Trento (2014, Italy), Beijing Institute of Technology (2015, China), and University of Orleans (2016, France) and she is a distinguished visiting professor at PSG College of Technology (2018, India).
She is the recipient of the 2019 Award for Excellence from the Board of Trustee, Clemson University, 2018 Global Innovation Contest by LGChem, 2018 Ralph R. Teetor Educational Award, by the Society of Automotive Engineers, 2017 NSF CAREER award, 2017 Clemson University College of Engineering and Science Dean’s Faculty Fellows Award, 2017 Clemson University Esin Gulari Leadership & Service Award, 2016 Energy Leadership Award in the category Emerging Leader (for the Carolinas), the 2015 Innovision Award (South Carolina), and 2012 Lumley Interdisciplinary Research, 2011 Outstanding Technology Team Award, TechColumbus. She was Chair of the IEEE CSS Technical Committee of Automotive Controls from 2015-2017, she is vice-chair of the IFAC TC on Automotive Control TC7.1 since 2015, and associate editor of the SAE International Journal of Alternative Powertrains since 2012 and IEEE Intelligent Vehicle Transactions since 2019 . She has co-authored a book, 2 book chapters and more than 120 peer-reviewed papers on hybrid electric vehicles simulation, optimization and control, estimation and control of electrochemical processes and catalytic conversion devices, such as batteries and after-treatment devices.

Friedrich Prinz

Leonardo Professor and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

Fritz Prinz is the Leonardo Professor in the School of Engineering at Stanford University, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy. He also serves as the Director of the Nanoscale Prototyping Laboratory and Faculty Co-director of the NPL-Affiliate Program. A solid-state physicist by training, Prinz leads a group of doctoral students, postdoctoral scholars, and visiting scholars who are addressing fundamental issues on energy conversion and storage at the nanoscale. In his Laboratory, a wide range of nano-fabrication technologies are employed to build prototype fuel cells and capacitors with induced topological electronic states. We are testing these concepts and novel material structures through atomic layer deposition, scanning tunneling microscopy, impedance spectroscopy and other technologies. In addition, the Prinz group group uses atomic scale modeling to gain insights into the nature of charge separation and recombination processes. Before coming to Stanford in 1994, he was on the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University. Prinz earned a PhD in Physics at the University of Vienna.

Ram Rajagopal

Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

Ram Rajagopal is an Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University, where he directs the Stanford Sustainable Systems Lab (S3L), focused on large-scale monitoring, data analytics and stochastic control for infrastructure networks, in particular, power networks. His current research interests in power systems are in the integration of renewables, smart distribution systems, and demand-side data analytics.

He holds a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and an M.A. in Statistics, both from the University of California Berkeley, Masters in Electrical and Computer Engineering from University of Texas, Austin and Bachelors in Electrical Engineering from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. He is a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award, Powell Foundation Fellowship, Berkeley Regents Fellowship and the Makhoul Conjecture Challenge award. He holds more than 30 patents and several best paper awards from his work and has advised or founded various companies in the fields of sensor networks, power systems, and data analytics.

Stefan Reichelstein

William R. Timken Professor in the Graduate School of Business, Emeritus

Stefan Reichelstein is known internationally for his research on the interface of management accounting and economics. Much of his work has addressed issues in cost- and profitability analysis, decentralization, internal pricing and performance measurement. His research projects have spanned analytical models, empirical work and field studies. Reichelstein’s papers have been published consistently in leading management and economic journals. Insights from his research have been applied by a range of corporations and government agencies. In recent years, Reichelstein has also studied the cost competitiveness of low-carbon energy solutions, with a particular focus on solar PV and carbon capture by fossile fuel power plants.

Stefan Reichelstein received his Ph.D. from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in 1984. Prior to that, he completed his undergraduate studies in economics at the University of Bonn in Germany. Over the past 30 years, Reichelstein has served on the faculties of the Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley, the University of Vienna in Austria, and the Stanford Graduate School of Business. His teaching has spanned financial and managerial accounting courses offered to undergraduate, MBA, and doctoral students. In recent years, he has introduced new courses on Sustainability and Clean Energy at the Stanford Business School. Reichelstein’s research has been supported by the National Science Foundation and a range of private foundations; several of his papers have won “Best-Paper” awards. Reichelstein serves on the editorial boards of several journals; he is also currently an editor of the Review of Accounting Studies and Foundations and Trends in Accounting. Until 2010, he served as the Department Editor for Accounting at Management Science. Professor Reichelstein has been a consultant to select companies and non-profit organizations. He has received honorary doctorates from the Universities of Fribourg (2008) and Mannheim (2011). In 2007, Reichelstein was appointed a Honorar-Professor at the University of Vienna.

Alicia Seiger

Managing Director, Sustainable Finance Initiative, Precourt Institute for Energy

Alicia Seiger is a lecturer at Stanford Law School and leads sustainable and energy finance initiatives at Stanford law and business schools and the Precourt Institute for Energy. A serial entrepreneur and pioneer of new business models, Alicia was at the forefront of the web advertising and carbon offset industries before pursuing solutions in sustainable finance. Alicia co-founded the Aligned Intermediary, an investment advisory group helping large-scale investors channel capital into resource innovation investments and Stanford Professionals in Energy (SPIE), a resource platform connecting Stanford alumni from all seven schools around the world. Alicia serves on the board of PRIME Coalition and Ceres, and advises student entrepreneurs building climate solutions. She holds a MBA from the Stanford Graduate School of Business, where she also worked as a case writer for the Center for Entrepreneurial Studies, and a BA in Environmental Policy and Cultural Anthropology from Duke University.

William Abraham Tarpeh

Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering, by courtesy, of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Center Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

Reimagining liquid waste streams as resources can lead to recovery of valuable products and more efficient, less costly approaches to reducing harmful discharges to the environment. Pollutants in effluent streams can be captured and used as valuable inputs to other processes. For example, municipal wastewater contains resources like energy, water, nutrients, and metals. The Tarpeh Lab develops and evaluates novel approaches to resource recovery from “waste” waters at several synergistic scales: molecular mechanisms of chemical transport and transformation; novel unit processes that increase resource efficiency; and systems-level assessments that identify optimization opportunities. We employ understanding of electrochemistry, separations, thermodynamics, kinetics, and reactor design to preferentially recover resources from waste. We leverage these molecular-scale insights to increase the sustainability of engineered processes in terms of energy, environmental impact, and cost.

John Weyant

Professor (Research) of Management Science and Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

John P. Weyant is Professor of Management Science and Engineering and Director of the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) at Stanford University. He is also a Senior Fellow of the Precourt Institute for Energy and an an affiliated faculty member of the Stanford School of Earth, Environment and Energy Sciences, the Woods Institute for the Environment, and the Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford. His current research focuses on analysis of multi-sector, multi-region coupled human and earth systems dynamics, global change systems analysis, energy technology assessment, and models for strategic planning.

Weyant was a founder and serves as chairman of the Integrated Assessment Modeling Consortium (IAMC), a fourteen-year old collaboration among over 60 member institutions from around the world. He has been an active adviser to the United Nations, the European Commission, U.S.Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of State, and the Environmental Protection Agency. In California, he has been and adviser to the California Air Resources, the California Energy Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission..

Weyant was awarded the US Association for Energy Economics’ 2008 Adelmann-Frankel award for unique and innovative contributions to the field of energy economics and the award for outstanding lifetime contributions to the Profession for 2017 from the International Association for Energy Economics, and a Life Time Achievement award from the Integrated Assessment Modeling Consortium in 2018. Weyant was honored in 2007 as a major contributor to the Nobel Peace prize awarded to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and in 2008 by Chairman Mary Nichols for contributions to the to the California Air Resources Board's Economic and Technology Advancement Advisory Committee on AB 32.

Fields of Specialization:
Energy/Environmental Policy Analysis, Strategic Planning

Interests:
Overall goal is to accelerate the use of systems models at state, country, and global scales, aiming to provide the best available information and insights to government and private-sector decision makers. Specific areas include energy, climate change, and sustainable development policy, including emerging technologies and market design alternatives. Draws on concepts and techniques from science and engineering fundamentals (e.g., thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, materials science, and electrical power systems), operations research, economics, finance, and decision theory.

Xiaolin Zheng

Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

Professor Zheng received her Ph.D. in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University (2006), B.S. in Thermal Engineering from Tsinghua University (2000). Prior to joining Stanford in 2007, Professor Zheng did her postdoctoral work in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard University. Professor Zheng is a member of MRS, ACS and combustion institute. Professor Zheng received the TR35 Award from the MIT Technology Review (2013), one of the 100 Leading Global Thinkers by the Foreign Policy Magazine (2013), 3M Nontenured Faculty Grant Award (2013), the Presidential Early Career Award (PECASE) from the white house (2009), Young Investigator Awards from the ONR (2008), DARPA (2008), Terman Fellowship from Stanford (2007), and Bernard Lewis Fellowship from the Combustion Institute (2004).