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Energy@Stanford & SLAC 2020 Speakers

Zhenan Bao

K. K. Lee Professor in the School of Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Chemistry

Zhenan Bao joined Stanford University in 2004. She is currently a K.K. Lee Professor in Chemical Engineering, and with courtesy appointments in Chemistry and Material Science and Engineering. She is the Department Chair of Chemical Engineering from 2018. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and National Academy of Inventors. She founded the Stanford Wearable Electronics Initiative (eWEAR) and is the current faculty director. She is also an affiliated faculty member of Precourt Institute, Woods Institute, ChEM-H and Bio-X. Professor Bao received her Ph.D. degree in Chemistry from The University of Chicago in 1995 and joined the Materials Research Department of Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies. She became a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff in 2001. Professor Bao currently has more than 550 refereed publications and more than 65 US patents. She served as a member of Executive Board of Directors for the Materials Research Society and Executive Committee Member for the Polymer Materials Science and Engineering division of the American Chemical Society. She was an Associate Editor for the Royal Society of Chemistry journal Chemical Science, Polymer Reviews and Synthetic Metals. She serves on the international advisory board for Advanced Materials, Advanced Energy Materials, ACS Nano, Accounts of Chemical Reviews, Advanced Functional Materials, Chemistry of Materials, Chemical Communications, Journal of American Chemical Society, Nature Asian Materials, Materials Horizon and Materials Today. She is one of the Founders and currently sits on the Board of Directors of C3 Nano Co. and PyrAmes, both are silicon valley venture funded companies. She is Fellow of AAAS, ACS, MRS, SPIE, ACS POLY and ACS PMSE. She was a recipient of the ACS Central Science Disruptor and Innovator Prize in 2020, ACS Gibbs Medal in 2020, the Wilhelm Exner Medal from the Austrian Federal Minister of Science in 2018, the L'Oreal UNESCO Women in Science Award North America Laureate in 2017. She was awarded the ACS Applied Polymer Science Award in 2017, ACS Creative Polymer Chemistry Award in 2013 ACS Cope Scholar Award in 2011, and was selected by Phoenix TV, China as 2010 Most influential Chinese in the World-Science and Technology Category. She is a recipient of the Royal Society of Chemistry Beilby Medal and Prize in 2009, IUPAC Creativity in Applied Polymer Science Prize in 2008, American Chemical Society Team Innovation Award 2001, R&D 100 Award, and R&D Magazine Editors Choice Best of the Best new technology for 2001. She has been selected in 2002 by the American Chemical Society Women Chemists Committee as one of the twelve Outstanding Young Woman Scientist who is expected to make a substantial impact in chemistry during this century. She is also selected by MIT Technology Review magazine in 2003 as one of the top 100 young innovators for this century. She has been selected as one of the recipients of Stanford Terman Fellow and has been appointed as the Robert Noyce Faculty Scholar, Finmeccanica Faculty Scholar and David Filo and Jerry Yang Faculty Scholar.

Brian Bartholomeusz

Executive Director of Innovation Transfer, TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy, TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy Operations

Brian has held senior technology management positions in startups and established companies. He has focused on business and technology strategy, and managed the development and commercialization of new products for renewable energy and consumer electronics. He facilitated successful cross-border joint ventures, technology partnerships, and collaborative technology and product development programs. Brian has co-founded three startups and participated in a successful initial public stock offering. He has written more than 25 peer-reviewed publications, submitted fourteen granted and pending patents, and spoken at industry events.

Sally Benson

Precourt Family Professor and Director, Precourt Institute for Energy

Sally M. Benson, who joined Stanford University in 2007, is the co-director of Stanford's Precourt Institute. A Professor in the Department of Energy Resources Engineering in the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences; she studies technologies and pathways to reducing greenhouse gas emissions including geologic storage of CO2 in deep underground formations and energy systems analysis for a low-carbon future. She also directs Stanford’s Global Climate and Energy Project.

Prior to joining Stanford, Benson was Division Director for Earth Sciences, Associate Laboratory Director for Energy Sciences and Deputy Director at LBNL.

Professor Benson serves on the Board of Directors for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Climate Central. Currently she also serves on the Advisory Boards for Argonne National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Princeton’s Carbon Mitigation Initiative, Princeton’s Adlinger Center, Japan’s Initiative for the Cool Earth Forum, and the Lahore University of Management Science in Pakistan. Over the past several years she participated in a number of National Academy of Sciences, Secretary of Energy, and National Petroleum Council research needs assessments related to carbon management. She also is on the Editorial Board for Energy and Environmental Sciences.

Julie Blumreiter

Julie Blumreiter is the CTO and co-founder of ClearFlame Engines, where her mission is to bring about a clean and equitable future for all people. The foundational science behind ClearFlame grew out of Stanford University’s Advanced Energy Systems Laboratory, where Julie completed her PhD in 2016.  Her PhD work focused on modifying engines to study high efficiency, advanced compression ignition concepts. Through her work at ClearFlame, Julie has helped the company to secure over $2M in grant funding, over $3M in VC seed funding, and valuable partnerships with leading engine manufacturers.  In 2017 ClearFlame gained entrance into the inaugural cohort of the DOE-funded Chain Reaction Innovations (CRI) Program, where Julie continued to develop ClearFlame’s core technology.  She is working to refine ClearFlame’s low-carbon, low-NOx combustion strategy on heavy-duty engine platforms, and has begun construction of their first commercial demonstration unit.  Her efforts will position ClearFlame to conduct pilot testing and scale-up of their powerful, low-cost engine technology.

Naomi Boness

Managing Director, Natural Gas Initiative, Department of Geophysics - Geophysics

Bruce Cain

Charles Louis Ducommun Professor in Humanities and Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and at the Precourt Institute for Energy

Bruce E. Cain is a Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and Director of the Bill Lane Center for the American West. He received a BA from Bowdoin College (1970), a B Phil. from Oxford University (1972) as a Rhodes Scholar, and a Ph D from Harvard University (1976). He taught at Caltech (1976-89) and UC Berkeley (1989-2012) before coming to Stanford. Professor Cain was Director of the Institute of Governmental Studies at UC Berkeley from 1990-2007 and Executive Director of the UC Washington Center from 2005-2012. He was elected the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2000 and has won awards for his research (Richard F. Fenno Prize, 1988), teaching (Caltech 1988 and UC Berkeley 2003) and public service (Zale Award for Outstanding Achievement in Policy Research and Public Service, 2000). His areas of expertise include political regulation, applied democratic theory, representation and state politics. Some of Professor Cain’s most recent publications include “Malleable Constitutions: Reflections on State Constitutional Design,” coauthored with Roger Noll in University of Texas Law Review, volume 2, 2009; “More or Less: Searching for Regulatory Balance,” in Race, Reform and the Political Process, edited by Heather Gerken, Guy Charles and Michael Kang, CUP, 2011; “Redistricting Commissions: A Better Political Buffer?” in The Yale Law Journal, volume 121, 2012; and Democracy More or Less (CUP, 2015). He is currently working on problems of environmental governance.

Janet Chikofsky

Janet Chikofsky is a Program Associate at Climate Interactive, where she provides research and support for leaders using Climate Interactive’s climate and energy tools.

Janet earned her bachelor’s degree in Human Biology from Stanford University, where she concentrated in Environmental Health. Before joining Climate Interactive, she worked with Duke Medicine Global, a consulting team at Duke University providing global health education and policy analysis for international organizations. Janet has also worked for Heifer International, planning and facilitating experiential education programs addressing global poverty and environmental problems. Janet is passionate about empowering people to make informed and equitable environmental decisions. She lives in North Carolina with her husband and enjoys backpacking in any mountain range she can find.

William Chueh

Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

The availability of low-cost but intermittent renewable electricity (e.g., derived from solar and wind) underscores the grand challenge to store and dispatch energy so that it is available when and where it is needed. Redox-active materials promise the efficient transformation between electrical, chemical, and thermal energy, and are at the heart of carbon-neutral energy cycles. Understanding design rules that govern materials chemistry and architecture holds the key towards rationally optimizing technologies such as batteries, fuel cells, electrolyzers, and novel thermodynamic cycles. Electrochemical and chemical reactions involved in these technologies span diverse length and time scales, ranging from Ångströms to meters and from picoseconds to years. As such, establishing a unified, predictive framework has been a major challenge. The central question unifying our research is: “can we understand and engineer redox reactions at the levels of electrons, ions, molecules, particles and devices using a bottom-up approach?” Our approach integrates novel synthesis, fabrication, characterization, modeling and analytics to understand molecular pathways and interfacial structure, and to bridge fundamentals to energy storage and conversion technologies by establishing new design rules.

Yi Cui

Director, Precourt Institute for Energy, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, of Photon Science, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemistry

Cui studies fundamentals and applications of nanomaterials and develops tools for their understanding. Research Interests: nanotechnology, batteries, electrocatalysis, wearables, 2D materials, environmental technology (water, air, soil), cryogenic electron microscopy.

Jennifer Dionne

Senior Associate Vice Provost for Research Platforms/Shared Facilities, Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

Jennifer Dionne is the Senior Associate Vice Provost of Research Platforms/Shared Facilities and an Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and of Radiology (by courtesy) at Stanford. Jen received her Ph.D. in Applied Physics at the California Institute of Technology, advised by Harry Atwater, and B.S. degrees in Physics and Systems & Electrical Engineering from Washington University in St. Louis. Prior to joining Stanford, she served as a postdoctoral researcher in Chemistry at Berkeley, advised by Paul Alivisatos. Jen's research develops nanophotonic methods to observe and control chemical and biological processes as they unfold with nanometer scale resolution, emphasizing critical challenges in global health and sustainability. Her work has been recognized with the Alan T. Waterman Award (2019), an NIH Director's New Innovator Award (2019), a Moore Inventor Fellowship (2017), the Materials Research Society Young Investigator Award (2017), Adolph Lomb Medal (2016), Sloan Foundation Fellowship (2015), and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (2014), and was featured on Oprah’s list of “50 Things that will make you say ‘Wow!'"

Rodney Ewing

Frank Stanton Professor in Nuclear Security, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and at the Precourt Institute for Energy

Rod Ewing is the Frank Stanton Professor in Nuclear Security in the Center for International Security and Cooperation in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and a Professor in the Department of Geological Sciences in the School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences at Stanford University. He is the Edward H. Kraus Distinguished University Professor Emeritus at the University of Michigan, where he was in three Departments: Earth & Environmental Sciences, Nuclear Engineering & Radiological Sciences, and Materials Science and Engineering. He is also a Regents' Emeritus Professor at the University of New Mexico.

Ewing received a B.S. degree in geology from Texas Christian University (1968, summa cum laude) and M.S. (l972) and Ph.D. (l974, with distinction) degrees from Stanford University where he held an NSF Fellowship. His graduate studies focused on an esoteric group of minerals, metamict Nb-Ta-Ti oxides, which are unusual because they have become amorphous due to radiation damage caused by the presence of radioactive elements. Over the past forty years, the early study of these unusual minerals has blossomed into a broadly based research program on radiation effects in complex ceramic materials. This has led to the development of techniques to predict the long-term behavior of materials, such as those used in radioactive waste disposal. He is the author or co-author of over 750 research publications and the editor or co-editor of 18 monographs, proceedings volumes or special issues of journals. He has published widely in mineralogy, geochemistry, materials science, nuclear materials, physics and chemistry in over 100 different ISI journals. He has been granted a patent for the development of a highly durable material for the immobilization of excess weapons plutonium.

Ewing has received the Hawley Medal of the Mineralogical Association of Canada in 1997 and 2002, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2002, the Dana Medal of the Mineralogical Society of America in 2006, the Lomonosov Gold Medal of the Russian Academy of Sciences in 2006, a Honorary Doctorate from the Université Pierre et Marie Curie in 2007, Roebling Medal of the Mineralogical Society of America, and is a foreign Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He is also a fellow of the Geological Society of America, Mineralogical Society of America, American Geophysical Union, Geochemical Society and the European Association of Geochemistry, American Ceramic Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland, and the Materials Research Society. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2017.

He has been president of the Mineralogical Society of America (2002) and the International Union of Materials Research Societies (1997-1998). Ewing has served on the Board of Directors of the Geochemical Society (2012-2015) and the Board of Governors of the Gemological Institute of America (2006-2015). He is a member of the Science and Security Board of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists and on the Editorial Board of Applied Physics Reviews . He is a founding Editor of the magazine Elements, which is now supported by 17 earth science societies, and a Founding Executive Editor of Geochemical Perspective Letters. He is a member of the Board of Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Academy of Science, Engineering and Medicine (2017-2020).

Professor Ewing is co-editor of and a contributing author of Radioactive Waste Forms for the Future (North-Holland Physics, Amsterdam, 1988) and Uncertainty Underground – Yucca Mountain and the Nation’s High-Level Nuclear Waste (MIT Press, 2006). He has served on eleven National Research Council committees for the National Academy of Sciences that have reviewed issues related to nuclear waste and nuclear weapons. He was appointed by President Obama to Chair the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (2012-2017).

Chris Field

Melvin and Joan Lane Professor for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies, Director, Woods Institute for the Environment, Professor of Earth System Science, of Biology and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

Chris Field is the Perry L. McCarty Director of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment and the Melvin and Joan Lane Professor for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies at Stanford University.

Prior to his 2016 appointment at the Stanford Woods Institute, Field was a staff member at the Carnegie Institution for Science (1984-2002) and founding director of the Carnegie’s Department of Global Ecology (2002-2016).

Field's research focuses on climate change, especially solutions that improve lives now, decrease the amount of future warming, and support vibrant economies. Recent projects emphasize decreasing risks from coastal flooding and wildfires. He has been deeply involved with national and international-efforts to advance understanding of global ecology and climate change. Field was co-chair of Working Group II of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (2008-2015), where he led the effort on “Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation” (2012), and “Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability(2014). His widely cited work has earned many recognitions, including election to the US National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Max Planck Research Award, and the Roger Revelle Medal. Field is a member of the Board of Directors of World Wildlife Fund (US) and the Board of Trustees of the California Academy of Sciences. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Geophysical Union, and the Ecological Society of America.

He holds a bachelor’s degree in biology from Harvard College and a Ph.D. in biology from Stanford.

Lawrence Goulder

Shuzo Nishihara Professor in Environmental and Resource Economics and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

Lawrence H. Goulder is the Shuzo Nishihara Professor in Environmental and Resource Economics at Stanford University and Director of the Stanford Center for Environmental and Energy Policy Analysis. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and at Stanford's Precourt Institute for Energy; a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research; and a University Fellow of Resources for the Future.

Goulder's research examines the environmental and economic impacts of environmental policies in the U.S. and China, with a focus on policies to deal with climate change and air pollution. His work also has explored the sustainability of natural resources and well-being in several countries. He has conducted analyses for several government agencies, business groups, and environmental organizations, and has served on advisory committees to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the California Air Resources Board. Results from his work have been published in academic journal articles as well as in the book, Confronting the Climate Challenge: Options for US Policy, which was published by Columbia University Press in 2017.

His work often employs a general equilibrium analytical framework that integrates the economy and the environment and links the activities of government, industry, and households. The research considers both the aggregate benefits and costs of various policies as well as the distribution of policy impacts across industries, income groups, and generations. Some of his work involves collaborations with climate scientists, biologists, and engineers.

Goulder graduated from Harvard College with an A.B. in philosophy in 1973. He obtained a master's degree in musical composition from the Ecole Normale de Musique de Paris in 1975 and earned a Ph.D. in economics from Stanford in 1982. He was a faculty member in the Department of Economics at Harvard before returning to Stanford's economics department in 1989.

Diana Gragg

Managing Director, Precourt Institute for Energy

An instructor on the teaching team for Understanding Energy, offered Fall, Spring and Summer:
CEE 107A/207A, EARTHSYS 103 Understanding Energy
CEE 107S/207S Understanding Energy: Essentials
https://energy.stanford.edu/understanding-energy

Stanford liaison for Winter quarter (spring break) course at Rocky Mountain Institute:
CEE 107R/207R E^3: Extreme Energy Efficiency
https://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207r/index.htm

Also serves as an advisor to Civil and Environmental Engineering Atmosphere/Energy students and as a pre-major advisor.

Stephan Graham

Chester Naramore Dean of the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences, Welton Joseph and Maud L'Anphere Crook Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Geophysics and of Energy Resources Engineering

Roland Horne

Thomas Davies Barrow Professor in the School of Earth Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

Roland N. Horne is the Thomas Davies Barrow Professor of Earth Sciences at Stanford University, and Senior Fellow in the Precourt Institute for Energy. He holds BE, PhD and DSc degrees from the University of Auckland, New Zealand, all in Engineering Science.

He is best known for his work in well test interpretation, production optimization, and analysis of fractured reservoirs. So far in his academic career he has supervised the graduate research of 52 PhD and 125 MS students. He is an Honorary Member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), and a member of the US National Academy of Engineering. He served on the International Geothermal Association (IGA) Board 1998-2001, 2001-2004, and 2007-2010, and was the 2010-2013 President of IGA.

Horne has been an SPE Distinguished Lecturer (1998 and 2009), and has been awarded the SPE Distinguished Achievement Award for Petroleum Engineering Faculty, the Lester C. Uren Award, and the John Franklin Carl Award. From Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG), he received the Best Paper in “Geophysics” in 2011, and from SPE he received Best Paper in Journal of Petroleum Technology (1992) and Best Paper in SPE Formation Evaluation (1993). He has also received five Best Paper awards from Geothermal Resources Council (GRC). He is a Fellow of the School of Engineering, University of Tokyo (2016) and also an Honorary Professor of China University of Petroleum – East China (2016).

Thomas Jaramillo

Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering, of Photon Science and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

Recent years have seen unprecedented motivation for the emergence of new energy technologies. Global dependence on fossil fuels, however, will persist until alternate technologies can compete economically. We must develop means to produce energy (or energy carriers) from renewable sources and then convert them to work as efficiently and cleanly as possible. Catalysis is energy conversion, and the Jaramillo laboratory focuses on fundamental catalytic processes occurring on solid-state surfaces in both the production and consumption of energy. Chemical-to-electrical and electrical-to-chemical energy conversion are at the core of the research. Nanoparticles, metals, alloys, sulfides, nitrides, carbides, phosphides, oxides, and biomimetic organo-metallic complexes comprise the toolkit of materials that can help change the energy landscape. Tailoring catalyst surfaces to fit the chemistry is our primary challenge.

BJ Johnson

BJ Johnson has been CEO of ClearFlame Engines since its incorporation in 2016. The company was founded based on BJ’s graduate work at Stanford University in the Advanced Energy Systems Lab with Professor Chris Edwards, which culminated in an M.S. in 2011 and a Ph.D. in 2015, both in Mechanical Engineering. His work focused on developing ways to significantly increase the performance of, and reduce emissions from, internal combustion engines for medium- and heavy-duty applications. The research centered on the use of alcohol fuels—due to their low-cost, clean-burning properties—which he used to demonstrate an unparalleled combination of high performance and low emissions. BJ was the lead inventor on a patent filed by Stanford University on this work, which now forms the center of ClearFlame’s IP. While at Stanford, BJ was supported by fellowships from the National Science Foundation and Achievement Rewards for College Scientists organization.
As CEO of ClearFlame, BJ helped to secure a position in the Chain Reaction Innovations program at Argonne National Laboratory, which provided ClearFlame with salaries, access to lab equipment and scientists, and public research funding from the Department of Energy. BJ has worked to obtain other competitive, non-dilutive grants for ClearFlame, including Small Business Innovation Research awards from the National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, and Department of Agriculture, along with a Technology Transfer grant from Stanford. BJ has also garnered additional fellowship support from the Echoing Green Foundation and the Straubel Foundation.
At ClearFlame, BJ has demonstrated his leadership by obtaining investors and strategic partners to assist in the development and deployment of the ClearFlame technology, in order to provide cleaner and more powerful engine solutions for the diesel sector. This includes support from the U.S. biofuels sector, where ClearFlame was named as of the “Next 50” upcoming companies by the Advanced Bioeconomy Leadership Conference. Experts from both the public and private sectors have been excited to back ClearFlame, because they realize the advantages that alternative-fuel heavy-duty engines offer compared to the leading alternatives.
BJ is originally from Seattle, Washington, and moved to Palo Alto, California to attend Stanford University as an undergrad—completing a B.S. with Distinction in Mechanical Engineering in 2009. While at Stanford he was a member of the Varsity swim team, which annually competed for national championships. BJ has also competed in swimming as a member of the U.S. National Team at the 2013 and 2014 World Championships, the 2015 Pan American Games, and the 2017 Maccabiah Games.

Drew Jones

Drew Jones is co-director of Climate Interactive (CI). He is a system dynamics modeler, facilitator, trainer and designer of simulation-based learning environments. Jones has focused his practice on helping individuals and teams solve problems by applying system dynamics modeling and systems thinking in the areas of corporate sustainability, diabetes and public health, global climate change, and land use policy. He and his team at CI and MIT Sloan developed C-ROADS, a user-friendly climate simulation now used by U.S. federal officials and analysts for the Chinese Government. Jones previously worked at the Sustainability Institute and at the Rocky Mountain Institute. He earned a BA at Dartmouth College and an MS in technology and policy at MIT.

Chi-Chang Kao

Director of SLAC and Professor of Photon Science

SLAC Director Chi-Chang Kao, a noted X-ray scientist, came to SLAC in 2010 to serve as associate laboratory director for the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. He became SLAC’s fifth director in November 2012.

Previously, Kao served for five years as chairperson of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. He undertook major upgrades to the light source's scientific programs and experimental facilities while developing potential science programs for NSLS-II, one of the newest and most advanced synchrotron facilities in the world. His research focuses on X-ray physics, superconductivity, magnetic materials and the properties of materials under high pressure.

Kao earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering in 1980 from National Taiwan University and a doctorate in chemical engineering from Cornell University in 1988. He joined Brookhaven shortly afterward, working his way from NSLS postdoctoral research assistant to chair. Kao also served as an adjunct professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Stony Brook University.

He was elected a fellow of the American Physical Society in 2006 and was named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2010 for his many contributions to resonant elastic and inelastic X-ray scattering techniques and their application to materials physics, as well as for his leadership at the NSLS.

Charles Kolstad

Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, at the Precourt Institute for Energy and at the Woods Institute for the Enviornment and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics

WINTER-SPRING 2021: ON SABBATICAL LEAVE

[OFFICE HOURS: Email for Zoom appointment]

Prof. Charles D. Kolstad is an energy and environmental economist with a research focus on the economics of climate change. He is also involved in research on energy markets, fossil fuels being largely responsible for greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. He has been a Lead Author and a Convening Lead Author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (co-recipient of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize), is a founding Co-Editor of the University of Chicago Press journal Review of Environmental Economics & Policy and has served on many advisory boards. He is a former president of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists (AERE).

At Stanford, Prof. Kolstad is the co-faculty director of the Bits & Watts Initiative. In addition to his affiliation with the Department of Economics, Prof. Kolstad holds senior fellow appointments in the Precourt Institute for Energy (PIE), the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR) and the Woods Institute for the Environment. Prior to joining Stanford in 2012, Prof. Kolstad was a Distinguished Professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he was the Bren Distinguished Professor of Environmental Economics, Chair of the Department of Economics and co-director of the UC system-wide University of California Center for Energy and Environmental Economics (UCE3). He is a University Fellow at Resources for the Future (Washington, DC), a Fellow of CESifo (Munich) and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, MA).

PhD students who wish to study with him (or another Stanford professor in the field of environmental, resource or energy economics) should first apply to a degree-granting department or program at Stanford (such as Economics, Management Science & Engineering, the Graduate School of Business or the Emmet Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources), mentioning my name (no need to contact me in advance). See further information in the link at the side of this page ("Info for Prospective PhD Students").

At Stanford, Prof. Kolstad is affiliated with:
Department of Economics
Emmet Interdisciplinary Program in Energy and Resources (E-IPER)
Stanford Environmental and Energy Policy Analysis Center (SEEPAC)
Precourt Institute for Energy (PIE)
Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR)
Woods Institute for the Environment
Bits and Watts Initiative

Jon Levin photo

Jonathan Levin

Philip H. Knight Professor and Dean of Stanford Graduate School of Business

Jonathan Levin is the Philip H. Knight Professor and Dean at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. He is an economist with interests in industrial organization, market design and the economics of technology. He has been a professor at Stanford for more than fifteen years, and previously served as Chair of Stanford’s Department of Economics. He has received many recognitions for teaching and research, including the Dean’s Award for Outstanding Teaching at Stanford, and the American Economic Association’s John Bates Clark Medal as the outstanding economist under the age of forty.

Levin earned his B.S. Mathematics, and his B.A in English at Stanford University, a M. Phil in Economics from Oxford  University, and his Ph.D. in Economics from MIT.

Dr. Arun Majumdar

Jay Precourt Professor, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and of Photon Science and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

Dr. Arun Majumdar is the Jay Precourt Provostial Chair Professor at Stanford University, a faculty member of the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering (by courtesy) and former Director and Senior Fellow of the Precourt Institute for Energy. He is also a faculty in Department of Photon Science at SLAC.

In October 2009, Dr. Majumdar was nominated by President Obama and confirmed by the Senate to become the Founding Director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E), where he served till June 2012 and helped ARPA-E become a model of excellence and innovation for the government with bipartisan support from Congress and other stakeholders. Between March 2011 and June 2012, he also served as the Acting Under Secretary of Energy, enabling the portfolio that reported to him: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Reliability, Office of Nuclear Energy and the Office of Fossil Energy, as well as multiple cross-cutting efforts such as Sunshot, Grid Tech Team and others that he had initiated. Furthermore, he was a Senior Advisor to the Secretary of Energy, Dr. Steven Chu, on a variety of matters related to management, personnel, budget, and policy. In 2010, he served on Secretary Chu's Science Team to help stop the leak of the Deep Water Horizon (BP) oil spill.

After leaving Washington, DC and before joining Stanford, Dr. Majumdar was the Vice President for Energy at Google, where he assembled a team to create technologies and businesses at the intersection of data, computing and electricity grid.

Dr. Majumdar is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences, US National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His research in the past has involved the science and engineering of nanoscale materials and devices, especially in the areas of energy conversion, transport and storage as well as biomolecular analysis. His current research focuses on redox reactions and systems that are fundamental to a sustainable energy future, multidimensional nanoscale imaging and microscopy, and an effort to leverage modern AI techniques to develop and deliver energy and climate solutions.

Prior to joining the Department of Energy, Dr. Majumdar was the Almy & Agnes Maynard Chair Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering at University of California–Berkeley and the Associate Laboratory Director for energy and environment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He also spent the early part of his academic career at Arizona State University and University of California, Santa Barbara.

Dr. Majumdar served as the Vice Chairman of the Advisory Board of US Secretary of Energy, Dr. Ernest Moniz, and was also a Science Envoy for the US Department of State with focus on energy and technology innovation in the Baltics and Poland.

Dr. Majumdar received his bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay in 1985 and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in 1989.

Mayank Malik

Information Systems Spec, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Pamela Matson

Richard and Rhoda Goldman Professor in Environmental Studies, Director, Change Leadership for Sustainability and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute

PAMELA MATSON is an interdisciplinary sustainability scientist, academic leader, and organizational strategist. She served as dean of Stanford University’s School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences from 2002-2017, building interdisciplinary departments and educational programs focused on resources, environment and sustainability, as well as co-leading university-wide interdisciplinary initiatives. In her current role as the Goldman Professor of Environmental Studies and Senior Fellow in the Woods Institute for the Environment, she leads the graduate program on Sustainability Science and Practice. Her research addresses a range of environment and sustainability issues, including sustainability of agricultural systems, vulnerability and resilience of particular people and places to climate change, and characteristics of science that can contribute to sustainability transitions at scale.

Dr. Matson serves as chair of the board of the World Wildlife Fund-US and as a board member of the World Wildlife Fund-International and several university advisory boards. She served on the US National Academy of Science Board on Sustainable Development and co-wrote the National Research Council’s volume Our Common Journey: A transition toward sustainability (1999); she also led the NRC committee on America’s Climate Choices: Advancing the Science of Climate Change. She was the founding chair of the National Academies Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability, and founding editor for the Annual Review of Environment and Resources. She is a past President of the Ecological Society of America. Her recent publications (among around 200) include Seeds of Sustainability: Lessons from the Birthplace of the Green Revolution (2012) and Pursuing Sustainability (2016).

Pam is an elected member of the National Academy of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a AAAS Fellow. She received a MacArthur Foundation Award, contributed to the award of the Nobel Prize to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, among other awards and recognitions, and is an Einstein Fellow of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Matson holds a Bachelor of Science degree with double majors in Biology and Literature from the University of Wisconsin (Eau Claire), a Master degree in Environmental Science and Policy from Indiana University’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs, a Doctorate in Forest Ecology from Oregon State University, and honorary doctorates from Princeton, McGill and Arizona State Universities. She spent ten years as a research scientist with NASA-Ames Research Center before moving to a professorship at the University of California Berkeley and, in 1997, to Stanford University.

Paul McIntyre

Rick and Melinda Reed Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Photon Science

McIntyre's group performs research on nanostructured inorganic materials for applications in electronics, energy technologies and sensors. He is best known for his work on metal oxide/semiconductor interfaces, ultrathin dielectrics, defects in complex metal oxide thin films, and nanostructured Si-Ge single crystals. His research team synthesizes materials, characterizes their structures and compositions with a variety of advanced microscopies and spectroscopies, studies the passivation of their interfaces, and measures functional properties of devices.

Ram Rajagopal

Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

Ram Rajagopal is an Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University, where he directs the Stanford Sustainable Systems Lab (S3L), focused on large-scale monitoring, data analytics and stochastic control for infrastructure networks, in particular, power networks. His current research interests in power systems are in the integration of renewables, smart distribution systems, and demand-side data analytics.

He holds a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and an M.A. in Statistics, both from the University of California Berkeley, Masters in Electrical and Computer Engineering from University of Texas, Austin and Bachelors in Electrical Engineering from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. He is a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award, Powell Foundation Fellowship, Berkeley Regents Fellowship and the Makhoul Conjecture Challenge award. He holds more than 30 patents and several best paper awards from his work and has advised or founded various companies in the fields of sensor networks, power systems, and data analytics.

Stefan Reichelstein

William R. Timken Professor in the Graduate School of Business, Emeritus

Stefan Reichelstein is known internationally for his research on the interface of management accounting and economics. Much of his work has addressed issues in cost- and profitability analysis, decentralization, internal pricing and performance measurement. His research projects have spanned analytical models, empirical work and field studies. Reichelstein’s papers have been published consistently in leading management and economic journals. Insights from his research have been applied by a range of corporations and government agencies. In recent years, Reichelstein has also studied the cost competitiveness of low-carbon energy solutions, with a particular focus on solar PV and carbon capture by fossile fuel power plants.

Stefan Reichelstein received his Ph.D. from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in 1984. Prior to that, he completed his undergraduate studies in economics at the University of Bonn in Germany. Over the past 30 years, Reichelstein has served on the faculties of the Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley, the University of Vienna in Austria, and the Stanford Graduate School of Business. His teaching has spanned financial and managerial accounting courses offered to undergraduate, MBA, and doctoral students. In recent years, he has introduced new courses on Sustainability and Clean Energy at the Stanford Business School. Reichelstein’s research has been supported by the National Science Foundation and a range of private foundations; several of his papers have won “Best-Paper” awards. Reichelstein serves on the editorial boards of several journals; he is also currently an editor of the Review of Accounting Studies and Foundations and Trends in Accounting. Until 2010, he served as the Department Editor for Accounting at Management Science. Professor Reichelstein has been a consultant to select companies and non-profit organizations. He has received honorary doctorates from the Universities of Fribourg (2008) and Mannheim (2011). In 2007, Reichelstein was appointed a Honorar-Professor at the University of Vienna.

Juan Rivas-Davila

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

Juan Rivas is an Associate Professor at Stanford’s Electrical Engineering department. Before, he worked for GE Global Research in the high-frequency power electronics group. He has extensive experience in the design of dc-dc power converters working at MHz frequencies. He has published peer-reviewed work on power converters reaching up to 100 MHz using Si and WBG devices. He obtained his doctoral degree from MIT in 2006. His research interests include power electronics, resonant converters, resonant gate drive techniques, high-frequency magnetics, and finding new applications for power converters

Debra Satz

Vernon R. and Lysbeth Warren Anderson Dean of the School of Humanities and Sciences, the Marta Sutton Weeks Professor of Ethics in Society, and Professor of Philosophy

Debra Satz is the Vernon R. and Lysbeth Warren Anderson Dean of the School of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University, the Marta Sutton Weeks Professor of Ethics in Society, and Professor of Philosophy. Her research focuses on the ethical limits of markets, equality, theories of rational choice, feminist philosophy, and ethics and education. In 2004, Satz received the Walter J. Gores Award, Stanford’s highest teaching honor. Among her publications are Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets (Oxford University Press, 2010) and Economic Analysis, Moral Philosophy and Public Policy (Cambridge University Press, 2016) (with Dan Hausman and Michael McPherson.) She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

 

Alicia Seiger

Managing Director, Sustainable Finance Initiative, Precourt Institute for Energy

Alicia Seiger is a lecturer at Stanford Law School and leads sustainable and energy finance initiatives at Stanford law and business schools and the Precourt Institute for Energy. A serial entrepreneur and pioneer of new business models, Alicia was at the forefront of the web advertising and carbon offset industries before pursuing solutions in sustainable finance. Alicia co-founded the Aligned Intermediary, an investment advisory group helping large-scale investors channel capital into resource innovation investments and Stanford Professionals in Energy (SPIE), a resource platform connecting Stanford alumni from all seven schools around the world. Alicia serves on the board of PRIME Coalition and Ceres, and advises student entrepreneurs building climate solutions. She holds a MBA from the Stanford Graduate School of Business, where she also worked as a case writer for the Center for Entrepreneurial Studies, and a BA in Environmental Policy and Cultural Anthropology from Duke University.

George Shultz

Thomas W. and Susan B. Ford Distinguished Fellow at the Hoover Institution

George P. Shultz is the Thomas W. and Susan B. Ford Distinguished Fellow at the Hoover Institution and Advisory Council Chair of the Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford. He leads Hoover's Shultz-Stephenson Task Force on Energy Policy, which addresses energy policy in the U.S. and its effects on domestic and international political priorities, particularly national security.

Shultz is one of two individuals who have held four different federal cabinet posts; he has taught at three of this country's great universities; and for eight years he was president of a major engineering and construction company. He attended Princeton University, graduating with a BA in economics, whereupon he enlisted in the US Marine Corps, serving though 1945. He later earned a PhD in industrial economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and served on President Eisenhower's Council of Economic Advisors. From 1962 to 1969, Shultz was dean of the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business before returning to Washington to serve as secretary of labor, as director of the office of management and budget, and as secretary of the Treasury. Shultz was sworn in July 16, 1982, as the sixtieth US secretary of state and served until January 20, 1989. In 1989, Shultz was awarded the Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor.

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Christopher Tassone

Staff Scientist, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

At Santa Clara University Chrisopher began his research career studying novel synthesis techniques of nanostructured materials in collaboration with NASA Ames Research Center.  His graduate research at UCLA was focused on utilizing self-assembly to engineer material organizing from the nano to the mesoscale in order to develop materials with targeted properties.  In 2011 he joined SLAC as a postdoctoral fellow, jointly advised by Michael F. Toney, Ph.D. and Professor Michael McGehee,  to study process-structure relationships in organic semiconductors.  In 2013 he joined SLAC as a staff scientist where he currently runs a research group focused on combining informatics, in-situ measurements and chemistry to accelerate the discovery and deployment of new materials.  Focusing on applications in catalysis, photovoltaics and additive manufacturing.    

Christopher Tassone received his B.S. in Chemistry from Santa Clara University, and his Ph.D. from the University of California Los Angeles.

Michael Wara

Senior Research Scholar

Michael Wara is a lawyer and scholar focused on climate and energy policy.
Wara is Director of the Climate and Energy Policy Program and a senior research scholar at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, where he provides fact-based, bipartisan, technical and legal assistance to policymakers engaged in the development of novel climate and energy law and regulation. He also facilitates the connection of Stanford faculty with cutting edge policy debates on climate and energy, leveraging Stanford’s energy and climate expertise to craft real world solutions to these challenges.
Wara’s legal and policy scholarship focuses on carbon pricing, energy innovation, and regulated industries. He collaborates with economists, engineers and scientists in research on the design and evaluation of technical and regulatory solutions to climate and energy challenges. He is also an expert on international environmental law with a particular focus on the ozone and climate treaty regimes.
Prior to joining Woods, Wara was an associate professor at Stanford Law School and an associate in Holland & Knight’s government practice. He received his J.D. from Stanford Law School and his Ph.D. in Ocean Sciences from the University of California at Santa Cruz.

John Weyant

Professor (Research) of Management Science and Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

John P. Weyant is Professor of Management Science and Engineering and Director of the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) at Stanford University. He is also a Senior Fellow of the Precourt Institute for Energy and an an affiliated faculty member of the Stanford School of Earth, Environment and Energy Sciences, the Woods Institute for the Environment, and the Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford. His current research focuses on analysis of multi-sector, multi-region coupled human and earth systems dynamics, global change systems analysis, energy technology assessment, and models for strategic planning.

Weyant was a founder and serves as chairman of the Integrated Assessment Modeling Consortium (IAMC), a fourteen-year old collaboration among over 60 member institutions from around the world. He has been an active adviser to the United Nations, the European Commission, U.S.Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of State, and the Environmental Protection Agency. In California, he has been and adviser to the California Air Resources, the California Energy Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission..

Weyant was awarded the US Association for Energy Economics’ 2008 Adelmann-Frankel award for unique and innovative contributions to the field of energy economics and the award for outstanding lifetime contributions to the Profession for 2017 from the International Association for Energy Economics, and a Life Time Achievement award from the Integrated Assessment Modeling Consortium in 2018. Weyant was honored in 2007 as a major contributor to the Nobel Peace prize awarded to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and in 2008 by Chairman Mary Nichols for contributions to the to the California Air Resources Board's Economic and Technology Advancement Advisory Committee on AB 32.

Fields of Specialization:
Energy/Environmental Policy Analysis, Strategic Planning

Interests:
Overall goal is to accelerate the use of systems models at state, country, and global scales, aiming to provide the best available information and insights to government and private-sector decision makers. Specific areas include energy, climate change, and sustainable development policy, including emerging technologies and market design alternatives. Draws on concepts and techniques from science and engineering fundamentals (e.g., thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, materials science, and electrical power systems), operations research, economics, finance, and decision theory.

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Jennifer Widom

Frederick Emmons Terman Dean of the School of Engineering, Fletcher Jones Professor in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering

Jennifer Widom is the Frederick Emmons Terman Dean of the School of Engineering and the Fletcher Jones Professor in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. She served as Computer Science Department Chair from 2009-2014 and School of Engineering Senior Associate Dean from 2014-2016.  She was a Research Staff Member at the IBM Almaden Research Center before joining the Stanford faculty in 1993. Her research interests span many aspects of nontraditional data management. She is an ACM Fellow and a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences; she received the ACM-W Athena Lecturer Award in 2015, the ACM SIGMOD Edgar F. Codd Innovations Award in 2007, and a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2000.

Jennifer received her Bachelor's degree from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music in 1982 and her Computer Science Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1987.